Value Fiction Blog Tour for the Sandwich Generation

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Looking for some interesting Christian fiction to read while waiting at the doctor's office with your elderly parent? How about some historical or contemporary romance novels for those times you are sitting in the car pool pick up line waiting for a grandkid? Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing Group has several new novels for us to enjoy and you can find out about two of them right here at SandwichINK as we join them for a Value Fiction Blog Tour! What's that, you might ask? It's where several blogs join together to write about new books that might be of interest to their readers. In my case, I'll be reviewing books that might appeal to the Sandwich Generation, as well as the Baby Boomer Generation, their senior parents, and maybe even some kid books for our grandkids.

Christian contemporary romance novels like Beneath a Southern Sky are a fun way for the Sandwich Generation to pass time in a doctors office

BENEATH A SOUTHERN SKY by Deborah Raney is an intriguing contemporary novel that will remind many of us in the Baby Boomer Generation of the Doris Day movie, Move Over, Darling. Daria Camfield is a Christian missionary working with her husband, Nate, in South America. She is grief stricken when she is informed of the death of Nate. He had left her behind to provide medical help to people in a native village further away from their mission home base. Once she heard the news, she decided to go back to the states in order to have help from her family with the baby she was expecting. As in Doris Day's movie, time passed, she met another Christian man of high integrity who grew to love her and her daughter, and they were married. 

Three years after her husband's death she and her family are shocked and devastated to learn he had not died after all. Unlike Move Over Darling, this book is not a comedy. Instead it's an interesting Christian novel with substance that realistically portrays mission life along with all the ramifications of this particularly difficult situation. I really enjoyed reading it, especially since it had a solid ending that was very satisfying.

Christian romance novels like Yesterdays Promise remind me of regency romances but with more substance

YESTERDAY'S PROMISE, by Linda Lee Chaikin, is a novel similar to the Regency Romances my cousin and I enjoyed when we were young adults, only with more depth. Combining a dashing aristocrat, a sweet and lovely young woman of mystery, and a death that may not have been of natural causes, this has all the ingredients for an enjoyable read, coupled with well-researched historical information for both England and South Africa in the 1800s. It also includes a missionary theme interwoven with the fascinating mystery and, of course, a sweet romance. It's part two of a three part trilogy but it was fine that I hadn't read part one. One caveat to this book if you loan it to an elderly parent. It moves back and forth in time to heighten the suspense. It's a common tactic in many of today's TV shows, but that can make it hard for an aging parent to follow it. I'll be passing it on to my senior mom, but I'll warn her about that so she'll know what to expect. They do a great job of helping you keep track by putting the dates in the top, which I very much appreciated.

Both books combine interesting stories with faith-based plots to make our waiting periods a lot more interesting. I'm recommending them to you and plan to send some as gifts to a couple of my senior adult bookworms. They'll make a great Random Act of Kindness. 🙂  For that matter, I bet my sweet cousin will enjoy them along with a couple of my daughters. Definitely good books for all of my Sandwich Generation friends and family.  If you'd like to pick some up as well, you can find them at Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing Group, who provided these books for this review.  A hearty thank you to them for the blog tour and for providing all of us in the Sandwich Generation with some great reading options. 

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